Migraine Headache and Tension Headache Symptoms

A migraine is a severe headache usually followed by symptoms including nausea and vomiting. This would disable you in a few hours or maybe even days. The level at which this happens or even just its frequency varies.

Migraine
Migraine

A recent study shows that women have problems with migraines much more than men. Although its exact cause is unknown, birth control devices happen to be one of many culprits.

A good example ofsuch a birth control device is the oral contraceptives. It is because its ingredients alter the woman’s hormonal level and causes the migraine. The causecertainly is too much estrogen which is certainly put into what is already naturally produced by the body.

Besides migraine, oral contraceptives may cause medical abnormalities from uterine fibroids to breast cancer.

Sometimes, the migraine attack may occur before or after taking the oral contraceptive. If this happens regularly, you are advised to try another method of birth control. This could be avoided though if you take it with food or milk. You should take this at the same time daily and stick with the prescribed dosage that was given to you.

Women over the age of 35 and experience migraines as a result of using birth control tablets and other devices are at risk of getting a stroke. This is another reason why some institutions strongly advice females to use another thing if they don’t want to get pregnant.

Those who are diabetic, have high cholesterol levels and blood pressure are advised not to take oral contraceptives.

But there is hope. One of the newest oral contraceptives to date is Seasonal. This tablet was introduced into the market in 2003 and since it makes females only experience a period four times in one year, this means fewer headaches for migraine sufferers.

But this oral contraceptive may not work for everyone.

In case you suffer migraines due to neurological problems, this won’t do any good and you will have to find another birth control device.

Women may still choose to use oral contraceptives.This really is only after they are examined by the doctor and if everything looks good, he or she will prescribe a lower dose of oral contraceptives. Talking to your physician may even prevent a full blown migraine from happening since there’s really no permanent solution to stop this from happening.

But you’ll find some women who experience migraines even before they start using oral contraceptives. In fact, the frequency didn’t increase or decrease once they were around the tablet but complained that the severity of the migraine got worse.

The severity of the migraine will also not go away overnight after you quit using oral contraceptives. Studies show that it will have a few months to your hormonal levels to normalize and only then will you have the ability to see an improvement.

Despite that, migraines will still happen and you will not blame it only on the tablet but due to other factors such as the food you eat, stress at home or in the office, other medications that you may be taking, physical factors and changes in the environment.

So although there is a direct link between oral contraceptives and migraine, you cannot say that it is the only reason why women suffer from it more than men.

How to can you get rid of migraine All kinds of Headache?

How to can you get rid of migraine All kinds of Headache?


I have used excedrin migraine before and it works pretty good but is there anything else i can try?

Best answer:

Answer by ♀♀LSBN
See your MD about it, even if you need to go to the ER. They will prescribe you something, and maybe have you meet with a neurologist. Exedrine won’t do anything for it. My wife has BAD migraines. She will actually vomit and pass out! Hers get really bad. She goes into the hospital and the MD pretty often. She is on a drug for migraines called Maxalt. You can ask your MD about that, or ask about Topomax or Imitrex. She does NOT use them anymore because they made her feel bad and she is now taking the Maxalt. But your own MD can find a medicine that your body can handle… And you might need an anti-nausea medicine like Reglan if you get sick from the migraines. even though one drug makes you sick, your MD can find one that might help better. My wife also uses that. She lays down with an ice pack after she takes her meds…Some people don’t find anything that really works. Certain foods can trigger it like nuts, peanut butter, pork, spicy food like pepperoni… Also, hormonal things including a menstrual cycle can trigger migraines. I don’t recommend scented things or aromatherapy because migraines can worsen or be triggered by scented things or strong-smelling things. Cleaning supplies, chemicals, perfumes, bleaches… They can be bad for a migraine, and so is bright lights, t.v. screens, computer screens, noises… Migraine Headaches can be affected by what is affecting the senses. A dark, quiet room is best to lay down in. Please see your doctor and good luck.

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Migraine Migraine Headache and Tension Headache Symptom

Migraine is a common neurological condition that affects millions of people from all ages, nationalities and gender. Like any other disease, its presence is manifested by symptoms felt by the sufferer and whose existence allows physicians to make a diagnosis.

The most common migraine symptom and the most recognizable as well, is the headache. Although it is not present in the rarer forms of the disease, it is one evident sign of migraine. The headache that accompanies a migraine is not the kind that gives a dull ache. The pain felt by migraineurs is the intense, throbbing kind which sometimes necessitates complete rest and disrupts normal daily functions. However, a headache is not the only indicator that signals a migraine. Depending on the migraine attack, a host of other symptoms arise as well. Analyzing them helps the medical practitioner in determining what type of migraine the patient is suffering from and in prescribing the appropriate medications.

An inventory of migraine symptoms could be quite lengthy due to the various types of the disease. A generalized list of these include: severe headache on one or both sides of the head, nausea, vomiting, weakness, vision disturbance, sensitivity to light and sound, pain over one eye, aura, blurred vision and temporary blind spots. When the migraine comes with aura, this gives rise to a whole new set of symptoms that consists of: seeing flashing lights or zigzag lines, temporary blindness, speech difficulty, tingling and weakness in the limbs and face, confusion, giddiness and noise sensitivity. This does not mean the sufferer undergoes all the symptoms during the attack.

Most likely, he will experience only a few. Symptoms also vary from person to person. Further, a migraine symptom could be felt days before the attack, during the prodrome stage. In these times, the migraineur has unexplained feelings of elation or intense energy, cravings for sweets, thirst, drowsiness or irritability and depression.

Diagnosing migraine is not an easy task for the physician. In order to make an accurate evaluation, he will need to have as much information as possible, obtained from the patient and from medical tests conducted. Observation and analysis of symptoms is very helpful in arriving at a diagnosis. By knowing what symptoms are experienced by the patient, the specialist will be able to tell what type of migraine it is and what treatments are to be administered. During consultation, the patient will be required to describe the duration and frequency of his All kinds of Headache and how intense they are, where pain is located, presence of associated symptoms and behavior during a headache. Since other illnesses also exhibit similar sings to migraine, these have to be ruled out. A case in point is the fact that people with sever sinusitis also experience double vision and vision loss.

Experiencing migraine, however mild, is not a pleasant event. But the sufferer can put this to good use by being observant and recording what he is going through. The complexity of migraine and the difficulty in diagnosing it means that no detail is insignificant. Thus, if the patient is to take an active role in the management of his disease, he needs to be vigilant of every single migraine symptom.

Fioricet Warnings and The Fioricet ‘High’ and Abuse

Fioricet is a prescription medication used to relieve tension headaches. It works by relaxing muscle contractions that can result in mild to moderate head pain.

Fioricet is a combination of three ingredients: the pain reliever acetaminophen; butalbital, a barbiturate; and caffeine, a stimulant.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Fioricet in 1984. Novartis Pharmaceuticals was the original manufacturer. In 2003, Watson Pharmaceuticals bought the rights to Fioricet (Watson is now known as Actavis).

Fioricet is currently available from many manufacturers as a generic.

The original formulation of Fioricet included 50 milligrams (mg) of butalbital, 40 mg of caffeine, and 325 mg of acetaminophen.

However, in 2011 the FDA asked makers of prescription combination drugs with acetaminophen to limit the amount of that drug to no more than 325 mg in each tablet by 2014. This action was taken to protect consumers from severe liver damage, a risk linked with taking too much acetaminophen.

Today Fioricet includes 320 mg of acetaminophen, though some versions of the product sold online still have 325 mg.

The Fioricet ‘High’ and Abuse

The butalbital in Fioricet belongs to a class of drugs called barbiturates, a central nervous system depressant. Like other barbiturates, it has the potential to cause physical and psychological dependence, which can lead to abuse.

Those who use too much Fioricet may report feeling so relaxed and stress-free that they seek out the drug as a way to get high. Some describe it as feeling intoxicated. However, users can feel depressed and “crash” once the effects wear off.

Fioricet with Codeine

Another formula, Fioricet with codeine, is also made by Actavis to treat tension headaches. It contains 30 mg of codeine in addition to the other three drugs, and has an increased acetaminophen dose of 325 mg.

Fioricet with codeine carries a black-box warning about liver toxicity, and about the risk of respiratory problems and death in children caused by codeine.

Fioricet Warnings

Fioricet carries a black-box warning cautioning users about the link of acetaminophen to acute liver failure. In some cases, users of Fioricet have needed a liver transplant; in other cases, use of Fioricet has proven fatal.

Most problems have occurred with an acetaminophen dose of more than 4,000 mg a day. Those affected are often taking more than one product containing acetaminophen at the same time or have underlying liver disease.

Another caution concerns butalbital, which may be habit-forming and therefore has the potential to be abused.

Those with a condition known as porphyria, a rare hereditary blood disorder, should not use Fioricet.

Fioricet Withdrawal and Pain Pills?

Fioricet Withdrawal and discomfort Pills?
I have been getting Fioricet with codeine for the past year or so for my every day Migraines/Headaches.


My doctor reduce me off from the medication all of a sudden. I went through the particular withdrawal symptoms that I have been reading about. I did not want to call my Dr . about it, because I did not want him to get me personally back on it to try and taper off of it. I thought that I got that much without tapering off and I wanted to be off of all of them and never take them again. we wasn’t taking a lot of the particular medicine. Maybe 2-3 per day, if needed (I has been reading about people who get about 30 per day.. ) I was vomiting and using the bathroom a lot, I guess so the medication can get out of my program.

I got so dehydrated, we went to Urgent Care and they gave me an IV and some Tylenol 3 and Percocets for the Migraine pain I was having during the withdrawals. we took a percocet when I got home and I has been finally able to fall asleep.. I am wondering if I was getting withdrawals from the Butalbital or the Codeine in the Firoicet?? we stopped taking the Fioricet over a week ago.

I am sensation better. I took two Tylenol 3s a few days back for a bad headache. we haven’t had any given that.

I feel okay, no withdrawals at all. I am thinking it was the Butalbital I was depending on, and not the codeine….? furthermore, I just went through all of this…. I just found out that I need nose Surgery in about a 30 days and a half. Now, I know that they will be giving me discomfort pills for the recovery (probably Percocets or Vicodin), we don’t want to fall back into what I just went through.

we doubt I will, because these discomfort Pills are different ingredients compared to what I taking for over a year (Fioricet). Is the Butalbital more difficult to withdrawal from than the Codeine that is in Fioricet?

Addiction is a disease that impacts your behavior because your brain is pushing you toward continuing to use the drug that triggered the reward response again and again.

Addiction to opioids is difficult to escape from, and it can lead to overdose and death. Another element of the use of opioids is tolerance and dependence. While these aren’t the same as addiction, these scenarios often go hand in hand with one another.

An opioid tolerance means that your body has become somewhat immune to the effects of these drugs so that you require higher doses to feel anything. A physical dependence means that in many ways the presence of opioids has become your new normal.

If you suddenly stop using opioids when you’re physically dependent on them, whether or not you’re addicted, you may experience very uncomfortable symptoms which are categorized as withdrawal. Some of the symptoms of opiate withdrawal can include nausea, vomiting, goose bumps, cramping, diarrhea, agitation, anxiety, insomnia, and yawning. Withdrawal from opioids can range from annoying to very painful. During a medically-supervised opioid detox, doctors can prescribe certain medicines that can help keep the person more comfortable and help them be more successful at stopping their use of the drugs.

Some of the medicines that may be given to patients during opiate withdrawal include methadone, buprenorphine, clonidine, and naltrexone. These drugs do everything from providing a maintenance system for opioid addicts, to helping with the actual symptoms such as muscle aches and anxiety.

Some people may attempt to manage their own withdrawal from opioids, and not only can this be dangerous, but it is also often ineffective.

There are lots of answers, the best answer is:

Answer by Wulfgar
Codeine will be worse. I take Vicodin 2 & 4 a day depending on how i feel. Percocet and Vicodin are both drugs. I started on seven. /500 then went to 10/500 mg. Oh yea them great ole withdraws. Take Care.

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