Dangerous Migraine Headache and Tension Headaches

This months topic will address dangerous headaches. To keep this in perspective, most headaches are NOT dangerous. In fact, tension-type headaches and migraines are very common and remain the focus of most health care providers and patients who suffer from headaches. With that said, its important to discuss the signs and symptoms that might help all of us differentiate between headaches that are safe versus those which are not safe.

The most important factor to consider is when the typical headache is suddenly different. Some of these different symptoms may include slurred speech, difficulty communicating or formulating thought, seizures, fainting or loss of consciousness (even for a few seconds), memory lapses, double or blurred vision, profound dizziness, numbness in the face or half of the body, an alarm should sound off telling you to get this checked ASAP as these symptoms, when they deviate from the norm may be indicative of a more serious condition. This can be challenging as seizures are often related to migraines and might be a common symptom of a migraine headache for some migraine sufferers.

Signs of a dangerous headache include:

1.A headache that starts suddenly, especially if it’s of a severe degree.
2.Headaches that start later in life, especially after the age of 50.
3.A change in the quality of headaches.
4.Visual changes, including double vision or loss of vision.
5.Weakness, numbness, or any other neurological symptoms.
6.Fevers especially of rapid onset.
7.Change in mental status including sleepiness, hallucinations, speech changes or confusion.
8.Weight loss.

If there is ever ANY doubt about a dangerous headache, your physician should be contacted.
Typically, the migraine patient will notice a fairly consistent set of symptoms and even though the headaches can vary in intensity, the sequence of events is fairly consistent. Dangerous headaches are the ones that deviate significantly from that migraine sufferers norm. For example, suppose a patients typical migraine is: aura (bright, flashy lights in the visual field or, a strange odor precedes the migraine about 30 min. before the headache strikes), followed by a gradually increasing pain in half of the head which worsens to a point of nausea and sometimes vomiting if something isnt done to stop it (such as a las vegas chiropractic adjustment and/or some form of medication). If this is that patients usual, IF any of the 8 items previously listed above accompany the headache, it should be further evaluated often requiring an EEG (electroencephalogram) and/or MRI (Magnetic Resonant Image). The EEG will test for any electrical signal changes in the brain and the MRI will show space occupying structures such as tumors, bleeding, infection, aneurism, and if performed with a contrast agents, arterial malformations (that is, abnormal networks of blood vessels).

how do i get rid of tension headaches?

how do i get rid of tension headaches?

There are lots of answers, the best answer is:

Answer by Ka-Ka kripple are justins girl..
ok i get headaches all the time have u saw a doctor yet. i have and the said it was sound and the air around u.

A tension headache can put a damper on your day. This kind of headache usually develops in the afternoon, causing mild or moderate pain that may feel like dull tightness or a band of pressure. Tension headaches occur when neck, shoulder, and scalp muscles become tense. Some people experience tension headaches from time to time; others get them more often. While this type of headache is rarely debilitating, it can certainly make life miserable.

If you have frequent tension headaches (more often than once or twice a week), here are some strategies that can help you prevent them:

  1. Pay attention to the basics. Get enough sleep, don’t skip meals, and be sure to pace yourself to avoid stress and fatigue.
  2. Relaxation techniques. Physical and psychological relaxation therapies can help stave off tension headaches, so long as you practice these techniques regularly. Physical approaches include applying a heating pad to your neck and shoulders to relax the muscles. Exercising these muscles also helps by strengthening and stretching them. Guided imagery exercises that help you focus your attention on various parts of your body in order to relax them and release tension and stress can also help.
  3. Biofeedback. This relaxation technique requires special training but can help people avoid recurrent tension headaches. Typically, a therapist will attach electrodes to your skin to detect electrical signals from your neck and shoulder muscles. You then learn to recognize when you are becoming tense and practice ways to relax the muscles before they tighten so much that you develop a tension headache.
  4. Medical approaches. Some people with tension headaches have very sensitive areas, known as trigger points, at the back of the neck or in the shoulders. Injecting a local anesthetic into these areas may eliminate the pain and prevent the headache from occurring again. There are also a number of medications that can help keep tension headaches at bay. If non-drug therapies aren’t giving you the relief you need, talk with your doctor about the medication options that might be right for you.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!